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Beating Bullies | theaislenews.com

Beating Bullies

boy harrassed by two bullies

RICHMOND, VA – We hear horror stories about young children being bullied in schools and lawmakers have been trying to give schools the tools that they need to take action to protect their students.  Currently local school boards are required by state law to have anti-bullying policies; however, there is currently no actually definition of bullying in the Code of Virginia.   Delegate Jennifer McClellan’s HB 1871 will change that.

“It will require the board of education to develop a model anti-bullying policy, and it would require the schools to have education for their employees on how to have bully free environment,” says McClellan, who represents House District 71 in Richmond. Furthermore, the bill broadens the scope of that environment to include bullying involving parents and teachers. The bill was crafted with the input of several concerned organizations, including the Family Foundation and Equality Virginia.

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Beating Bullies

RICHMOND, VA – We hear horror stories about young children being bullied in schools and lawmakers have been trying to give schools the tools that they need to take action to protect their students.  Currently local school boards are required by state law to have anti-bullying policies; however, there is currently no actually definition of bullying in the Code of Virginia.   Delegate Jennifer McClellan’s HB 1871 will change that.

“It will require the board of education to develop a model anti-bullying policy, and it would require the schools to have education for their employees on how to have bully free environment,” says McClellan, who represents House District 71 in Richmond. Furthermore, the bill broadens the scope of that environment to include bullying involving parents and teachers. The bill was crafted with the input of several concerned organizations, including the Family Foundation and Equality Virginia.

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Beating Bullies

RICHMOND, VA – We hear horror stories about young children being bullied in schools and lawmakers have been trying to give schools the tools that they need to take action to protect their students.  Currently local school boards are required by state law to have anti-bullying policies; however, there is currently no actually definition of bullying in the Code of Virginia.   Delegate Jennifer McClellan’s HB 1871 will change that.

“It will require the board of education to develop a model anti-bullying policy, and it would require the schools to have education for their employees on how to have bully free environment,” says McClellan, who represents House District 71 in Richmond. Furthermore, the bill broadens the scope of that environment to include bullying involving parents and teachers. The bill was crafted with the input of several concerned organizations, including the Family Foundation and Equality Virginia.

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Beating Bullies

RICHMOND, VA – We hear horror stories about young children being bullied in schools and lawmakers have been trying to give schools the tools that they need to take action to protect their students.  Currently local school boards are required by state law to have anti-bullying policies; however, there is currently no actually definition of bullying in the Code of Virginia.   Delegate Jennifer McClellan’s HB 1871 will change that.

“It will require the board of education to develop a model anti-bullying policy, and it would require the schools to have education for their employees on how to have bully free environment,” says McClellan, who represents House District 71 in Richmond. Furthermore, the bill broadens the scope of that environment to include bullying involving parents and teachers. The bill was crafted with the input of several concerned organizations, including the Family Foundation and Equality Virginia.

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RICHMOND, VA – We hear horror stories about young children being bullied in schools and lawmakers have been trying to give schools the tools that they need to take action to protect their students.  Currently local school boards are required by state law to have anti-bullying policies; however, there is currently no actually definition of bullying in the Code of Virginia.   Delegate Jennifer McClellan’s HB 1871 will change that.

“It will require the board of education to develop a model anti-bullying policy, and it would require the schools to have education for their employees on how to have bully free environment,” says McClellan, who represents House District 71 in Richmond. Furthermore, the bill broadens the scope of that environment to include bullying involving parents and teachers. The bill was crafted with the input of several concerned organizations, including the Family Foundation and Equality Virginia.

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Delegate Jennifer Mcclellan

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boy harrassed by two bullies

boy harrassed by two bullies

bully
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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

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RichardAnderson

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young woman driving on highway while reading / writing text on smart phone.

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

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One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Christopher Head, Michael Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB 1760 as a part of his business agenda.

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One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Christopher Head, Michael Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB 1760 as a part of his business agenda.

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You must be logged in to post a comment.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Christopher Head, Michael Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB 1760 as a part of his business agenda.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Christopher Head, Michael Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB 1760 as a part of his business agenda.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Chris Head, Mike Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB1760 as a part of his business agenda.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Chris Head, Mike Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB1760 as a part of his business agenda.

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Delegate Ramadan

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One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Chris Head, Mike Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB1760 as a part of his business agenda.

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You must be logged in to post a comment.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Chris Head, Mike Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB1760 as a part of his business agenda.

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One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

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Texting While Driving Outlawed In Virginia?

transportation

RICHMOND, VA – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of U.S. drivers ages 18-29 admit to texting or emailing regularly while driving.

Virginia lawmakers in the General Assembly’s Senate and House of Delgates have passed bill HB 1907 in an attempt to encourage safe, undistracted driving.

Delegate Richard Anderson, chief patron of HB 1907 explains that the bill “takes texting while driving from a secondary to a primary offence.”

As a primary offence, if a law enforcement officer sees a driver texting, he can sight the incident and charge a $250 fine for a first offence and $500 for each subsequent offence.

As the law stands now, with texting while driving as a secondary offence, texting drivers are charged a minimal fine and can only be charged if the sighting is preceded by another, separate primary offence such as speeding or running a stop sign.

As a frequent driver on Interstate 95, Delegate Anderson states, “I will invariably see several dozen people texting and driving erratically. They’re swerving and going slow on I-95. Because they are texting they’re driving unsafely.”

The bill “creates rules on how we handle technology in situations where the technology contributes to an unsafe condition,” explains Delegate Anderson. “At first it will be a tough adjustment for people but they’ll get used to it.”

Nearly 40 other states already have laws in place prohibiting texting while driving. If the bill is signed into law by Governor McDonnell, the new measures will take effect in Virginia on July 1.

One Stop For All Virginia Businesses

Business iStock_000012204615XSmall

RICHMOND, VA – Currently business owners in Virginia are able to use an online portal that was designed to integrate all business processes into one easily accessible website called Business One Stop (BOS). From there a business can find all of the forms and information necessary to operate a business in Virginia except for information relating to the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  The SCC is the only agency that has no integrated its system into the BOS.

Delegate David Ramadan, chief patron of HB 1760, explains how he plans to change that. “This bill integrates the SCC into the Business One Stop so that there will truly be one stop for anybody starting or operating a business” in Virginia.  Once the SCC is fully integrated into the BOS, business operators can, from the outset, incorporate all tasks such as filing forms and reports into one place and they will all be processed within 48 business hours from the time an applicant submits them electronically.

Last year, Delegates David Ramadan, Christopher Head, Michael Watson, and Michael Webert jointly founded the Business Development Caucus. Their efforts help to ensure that the General Assembly passes legislation aimed at promoting job growth in Virginia.

“We went around the commonwealth all summer long and held business town halls, met with over 130 companies, and asked those companies, ‘What is your priority? What is it you need from us to make Virginia better for your businesses so you can create more jobs?’”

There were 12 issues that were identified from those out of those 130 meetings and as a result,  “12 bills were created. This is one of them. This was a real concern from Virginia businesses,” says Delegate Ramadan.

In a press release called the Job Creating and Workforce Development Agenda, Governor Bob McDonnell has adapted HB 1760 as a part of his business agenda.

Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Fighting the Summer Brain Drain

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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Group of young swimmers

Group of young swimmers

Swimmers hanging on side of pool, ages 9 to 12.

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

jet aircraft landing

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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jet aircraft landing

jet aircraft landing

large jet aircraft landing approach over suburban housing

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the ACLU and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the Founding Fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Surveillance Drone Bill Makes a Stand for Privacy Rights

RICHMOND, VA – Delegate Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) is teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union in an effort to pass HB 1616, legislation that would limit government use of drone aircraft technology in Virginia

Delegate Gilbert expressed concern regarding the potential misuse of the technology that would ordinarily be used for essential assignments such as search-and-rescue missions by law enforcement agencies. “They’re making these…vehicles as small as a bumblebee now, with cameras on them. They’re functional at that size,” explains Delegate Gilbert. “There are law enforcement agencies in Virginia that have already expressed an interest in acquiring drone technology.”

Delegate Gilbert’s bill would limit the ways that law enforcement agencies would be able to use such technology, as well as placing regulations on what can be done with the data acquired by the drones. Law enforcement agencies believe that using such technology lies within their rights, but Delegate Gilbert believes that the technology has surpassed what the current laws are prepared to address. “I don’t think that the founding fathers or the Supreme Court justices…really envisioned…that there could be a government surveillance drone positioned over your neighborhood 24/7.”  Delegate Gilbert’s concern is that the current laws were not written with the knowledge of future technological advances, because the technology of today was inconceivable at the time.

HB 1616 has received support from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Tea Party Federation, two groups who don’t often find themselves on the same side of an argument. “Normally, the ACLU and I don’t agree on a whole lot,” says Delegate Gilbert, “but when it comes to privacy rights and government intrusion in our lives, we are in lock-step.”

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Fighting the Summer Brain Drain

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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Fighting the Summer Brain Drain

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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Fighting the Summer Brain Drain

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

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RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to do something different with these schools.”

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Fighting the Summer Brain Drain

Group of young swimmers

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the Board of Education grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to try to do something different with these schools for the benefit of our children.”

RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the (General Assembly? Board of Education?) grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to do something different with these schools.”

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RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the (General Assembly? Board of Education?) grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to do something different with these schools.”

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RICHMOND, VA – Studies have shown that lower income students may lose much of what they learned in school the previous year over a long summer break.  Norfolk Public School Superintendent Samuel King and Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach) discussed methods to address this problem and as a result Delegate Stolle introduced HB 1596.  Currently, an individual school would have to request that the (General Assembly? Board of Education?) grant a waiver to alter its academic calendar.  HB 1596 would allow school superintendents, with the approval of the local school board, to change the calendar year for a failing school within their district, or the entire district if more than 15 percent of schools in a district fail to meet their accreditation requirements.

Delegate Stolle expects some resistance towards this legislation, but is making every effort to address any concerns. “Whenever we talk about giving school boards the authority to alter the calendar versus the General Assembly, people get upset.” Stolle stresses however, that this is not an attempt to change the calendar statewide, and that it will only affect a small percentage of the schools. “These are schools that have already shown that they are not reaching full accreditation, and so we need to do something different with these schools.”

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Time to Cut Bait

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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Time to Cut Bait

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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Time to Cut Bait

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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Time to Cut Bait

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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Time to Cut Bait

iStock_000018349417XSmall

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

Time to Cut Bait

RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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RICHMOND, VA – While once a delicacy, today the Menhaden, a small fish that inhabits both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean of Virginia, is used primarily today in omega-3 supplements, as fishmeal, and as a baitfish.  For some time now, Menhaden have been overfished in the Chesapeake Bay. “It’s the only fish that the Virginia Marine Resources Commission doesn’t collect comprehensive scientific data on, so they don’t set the regulations, the legislature does,” says Delegate Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach).  Overfishing of menhaden is especially problematic, as Menhaden, a food source for many larger fish, are critical to the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay. There have been efforts in the House to reduce the Menhaden catch for several sessions, but to no avail.  This changed when the federal government ordered Virginia to reduce its Menhaden catch, or it would step in and do so itself.   After discussing the issue with Omega Protein, a company that uses menhaden in a nutritional supplement, and local fisherman, Delegates Ware (R-Powhatan) and Knight introduced HB 1840. The allowable Atlantic Menhaden catch will be reduced by 20 percent, with a similar reduction to the Chesapeake catch.

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Zoë Dehmer


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

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Zoë Dehmer


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

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Zoë Dehmer


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

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Zoë Dehmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

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You must be logged in to post a comment.

Zoë Dehmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

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Zoe Dehmer

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Z. Dehmer


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

Leave a Comment

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Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com 
www.TheAisleNews.com

Leave a Comment

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Zoë Dehmer
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Zoe.Dehmer@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:   Info@AisleNews.com com
www.TheAisleNews.com

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris StolleIt is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendents.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris StolleIt is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendents.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

iStock_000005601645XSmall

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

RICHMOND, VA – Elections are big business in the United States.  Candidates hire campaign managers, political consultants, purchase advertisements on TV, put up signs, mail out campaign literature, and make phone calls.  While most of us are aware of the money that the campaigns spend on elections, we may not be aware of the cost of the elections to the states.

Virginia is one of only five states, including Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Kentucky, who hold statewide elections each year; and there are some legislators who feel that this places an additional strain on the voters and the electoral system in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  “The costs inherent in conducting a statewide election exceed millions of dollars in the sums paid for officers of election, custodian fees, equipment expenses, and other incidentals,” explains Senator Creigh Deeds.

“We are one of only a handful of states that have elections every single year.  There is a lot of voter fatigue,” says Senator Deeds.  “I think that if we study the election scheduling that we have in place right now, we will see that we are spending lots of money we don’t need to spend by having elections every year, and we are discouraging turnout.”

Senator Deeds has introduced SJ 289, which if approved, would create a joint committee to study Virginia’s elections for a year to determine how Virginia can cut costs and make the process more efficient.  “This is something that the majority of people would agree with,” continues Senator Deeds, “and something that would save us a ton of money.”

Deeds states simply, “What I want to do is save money and encourage as much turnout as possible.”

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Saving Money and Increasing Voter Turnout in Virginia

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendents.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendents.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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J. Brannon

Josh Brannon
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The Aisle News, Inc.

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www.TheAisleNews.com

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M. Welch

Mary “Alana” Welch
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Direct E-Mail: Mary.Welch@Aislenews.com

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M. Welch

Mary “Alana” Welch
Staff Writer/Assistant To The Editor
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail: Mary.Welch@Aislenews.com

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com 

www.TheAisleNews.com

 

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J. Brannon

Josh Brannon
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The Aisle News, Inc.
Main E-Mail: Info@AisleNews.com
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E. Palmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Palmore
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The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Erin.Palmore@AisleNews.com

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www.TheAisleNews.com

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E. Palmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Palmore
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Erin.Palmore@AisleNews.com

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com
www.TheAisleNews.com

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E. Palmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Palmore
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Erin.Palmore@AisleNews.com

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com
www.TheAisleNews.com

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E. Palmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Palmore
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Erin.Palmore@AisleNews.com

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com
www.TheAisleNews.com

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E. Palmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Palmore
Staff Writer
The Aisle News, Inc.
Direct E-Mail:  Erin.Palmore@AisleNews.com

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com
www.TheAisleNews.com

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K. Schoonover

 

Photography By Crystal Huffman

 

Katherine Schoonover
Editor
The Aisle News, Inc.
P.O. Box 17256
Arlington, VA 22216
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H. Schlicher

Heidi Schlicher
Director of Legislative Affairs

Virginia House (D)
The Aisle News, Inc.
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J.T. Jester

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J.T. Jester
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Direct E-Mail:  JT.Jester@AisleNews.com 

Main E-Mail:  Info@AisleNews.com 
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J.T. Jester

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J.T. Jester
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J.T. Jester

JT Jester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J.T. Jester
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J.T. Jester
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J.T. Jester
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J.T. Jester
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The Aisle News, Inc.
Arlington, VA 22216
Direct E-Mail:
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J.T. Jester

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J.T. Jester
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Arlington, VA 22216
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J.T. Jester

JT Jester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J.T. Jester
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Arlington, VA 22216
Direct E-Mail:
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J.T. Jester

JT Jester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J.T. Jester
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Arlington, VA 22216
Direct E-Mail:
JT.Jester@AisleNews.com
Main E-Mail: Info@AisleNews.com
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J.T. Jester

J.T. Jester
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Arlington, VA 22216
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Main E-Mail: Info@AisleNews.com
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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

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RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendent of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris StolleIt is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendents.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

Chris Stolle

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Chris Stolle

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia Board of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Cutting Red Tape to Improve Schools

RICHMOND, VA – There has been a great deal of discussion over the last four years regarding the potential benefits of charter schools in Virginia, however, according to Delegate Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, no new charter schools have opened during that time.  HB 2076 is an attempt to streamline the application process for all new charter schools.  Currently all charter school applications must be reviewed by the local school boards as well as the Virginia BpDepartment of Education.   Delegate Stolle’s bill would bypass the additional step of requiring that the application be reviewed by the Virginia Board Board of Education.

While HB 2076 is the “Governor’s bill, and part of the Governor’s charter school initiative, it aligns very closely with what I had discussed with the Superintendant of Schools in Norfolk.  Norfolk has a number of failing schools, so we sat down and looked at some things we could do to help facilitate the improvement of schools in Norfolk.”  One of these was allowing the local school boards to set up charter schools in their districts.

It is Delegate Stolle’s belief that those who believe that charter schools may be damaging to the public school system may be willing to reconsider their concern because of the support that charter schools are receiving from the local school boards and superintendants.  Superintendents and school boards can use charter schools in their districts in whatever way is most beneficial to their schools.  This legislation will help them to take steps more quickly to improve their schools by “bypassing a lot of the regulations that the public schools currently have to follow,” explains Delegate Stolle.

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Katherine Schoonover

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S. Spangenburg

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The Aisle News, Inc.
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Main E-Mail: Info@AisleNews.com
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Golf Carts on Highways?

We have all seen TV shows and movies depicting quaint little towns with all of their charm and idiosyncrasies, but very few of us have lived in small towns, and we don’t necessarily have a complete understanding of their way of life.  On the eastern coast of Virginia, just off of the Chesapeake Bay, is the little Town of Urbanna.  “It is a very small town with a population of 550 people,” said Delegate Keith Hodges.  “That’s where I live.”

Recently Urbanna passed an ordinance to allow people to drive golf carts on the highways.  “The language is already in the Code of Virginia to allow golf carts to be driven on the highways, but because they don’t have their own police department they have to seek an exemption from the General Assembly,” said Delegate Hodges.  “The Middlesex Sheriff [David P. Bushey] was perfectly good with it, and the town supports it.  The golf carts are required to meet all of the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) standards for safety and registration.   You have to understand,” said explains Delegate Hodges, “they go to church on golf carts.  It’s great!  They have their license plates; they have their emblems, their seatbelts, their lights and all of the standards.  You have to live in Urbanna to know and understand it.  It is probably one of the only towns where dogs can still run free.  We don’t have a leash law, and we never have any problems.”

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Redefining Small Business in Virginia

Beautiful business woman working in office

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Beautiful business woman working in office

Beautiful business woman working in office

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Redefining Small Business in Virginia

In many ways, Virginia prides itself on being different from other states.  We Virginians often cite our state’s many successes and awards as proof that we do things better here and that being different is not always a bad thing.  Currently, in Virginia a small business is defined as one having 250 employees or making up to 10 million dollars.

“Ninety five percent of all businesses in Virginia are considered small businesses,” explains Delegate Lopez.  “So this means that women and minority owned businesses get short shrift.  A procurement contract with the state government is a big deal for a small business and could be the key to its success. When a business applies for a contract, and the Procurement Officer of astate agency says to the owner, ‘I need to conform with SWaM regulations. Therefore I could choose a small woman or minority owned business.  However, it would be easier simply to choose a small business.’

I was the Assistant Administrator of the Small Business Administration for President Obama.  One thing that I thought was interesting was the existence of the federal NAICS codes.  These codes provide standards for hundreds of businesses that range from tech firms, to construction firms, to electric car manufacturers, to florists. There are criteria to identify what constitutes a small business in each category.

My bill, HB 781, would make Virginia’s small business definitions comply with the federal size standards.  Virginia should not have its own approach.  We should take on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s NAICS codes for small business standards. This is where we should go.”

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Eminent Domain Constitutional Amendment

Private Property

Ever since the Kelo v. City of New London case in 2005, legislators have been paying particularly close attention to their state’s eminent domain and property rights laws.  The Virginia General Assembly has analyzed the Code of Virginia in search of methods to protect Virginians and private property rights, and is considering a Constitutional Amendment to provide permanent protection.  Delegate Rob Bell is carrying HJ 3 in the House of Delegates in an attempt to provide that protection.

“This was an effort to address the abusive use of eminent domain by localities and other government agencies,” explains Delegate Bell.  “The goal would be to put property rights protection into the Virginia Constitution.  We passed a law in 2007.  I was the House patron and the then Senator Ken Cuccinelli was the Senate patron.  We passed laws to create protections for property owners, but it’s a law which it means that it is subject to change.  The goal that year, and ever since, has been to put protections into the Virginia Constitution where they can’t be changed by a subsequent legislature.  The amendment itself, which passed last year, will go before the public on the ballot in November if it passes this Session.  It does several things.  The first thing it says is that you can only take private property for public use.  You can’t take it and give it to somebody else, as happened in the Kelo case, which naturally prompted a great deal of this attention.  The second thing is that it says that you can’t acquire more property than you need.  That was out of a specific case in Hampton roads. They took the property. They took more than they needed and then instead of giving it back, they leased it out for a shopping center.  Then, the third thing it does is define what the actual compensation will be.  So, if someone has their property taken for public use they should be compensated.  It will help make sure that they get the full compensation for their property.  There is a Senate version and a House version.  We are optimistic that it will come up before the Privileges and Elections Committee on Friday.  We are hopeful that it will be reported out, and if so, that it will be heard on the floor next week.

The Constitutional Amendment is as controversial as the statute has been. Those who are condemners are very concerned about any restrictions on their ability to condemn.  As a result, the local governments have been ferociously opposed to this amendment. They have hired lobbyists to fight against it and have been working against the amendment.  When that was not possible, they have worked against the other legislation that we have introduced that go along with the amendment to help define the various terms and what not.  That is why the amendment didn’t pass in 2007.  It didn’t pass in 2009. We brought it in 2010, and we finally got it out in 2011, and now here we are on 2012 on the doorstep of actually getting it passed.”

Eminent Domain Constitutional Amendment

Ever since the Kelo v. City of New London case in 2005, legislators have been paying particularly close attention to their state’s eminent domain and property rights laws.  The Virginia General Assembly has analyzed the Code of Virginia in search of methods to protect Virginians and private property rights, and is considering a Constitutional Amendment to provide permanent protection.  Delegate Rob Bell is carrying HJ 3 in the House of Delegates in an attempt to provide that protection.

“This was an effort to address the abusive use of eminent domain by localities and other government agencies,” explains Delegate Bell.  “The goal would be to put property rights protection into the Virginia Constitution.  We passed a law in 2007.  I was the House patron and the then Senator Ken Cuccinelli was the Senate patron.  We passed laws to create protections for property owners, but it’s a law which it means that it is subject to change.  The goal that year, and ever since, has been to put protections into the Virginia Constitution where they can’t be changed by a subsequent legislature.  The amendment itself, which passed last year, will go before the public on the ballot in November if it passes this Session.  It does several things.  The first thing it says is that you can only take private property for public use.  You can’t take it and give it to somebody else, as happened in the Kelo case, which naturally prompted a great deal of this attention.  The second thing is that it says that you can’t acquire more property than you need.  That was out of a specific case in Hampton roads. They took the property. They took more than they needed and then instead of giving it back, they leased it out for a shopping center.  Then, the third thing it does is define what the actual compensation will be.  So, if someone has their property taken for public use they should be compensated.  It will help make sure that they get the full compensation for their property.  There is a Senate version and a House version.  We are optimistic that it will come up before the Privileges and Elections Committee on Friday.  We are hopeful that it will be reported out, and if so, that it will be heard on the floor next week.

The Constitutional Amendment is as controversial as the statute has been. Those who are condemners are very concerned about any restrictions on their ability to condemn.  As a result, the local governments have been ferociously opposed to this amendment. They have hired lobbyists to fight against it and have been working against the amendment.  When that was not possible, they have worked against the other legislation that we have introduced that go along with the amendment to help define the various terms and what not.  That is why the amendment didn’t pass in 2007.  It didn’t pass in 2009. We brought it in 2010, and we finally got it out in 2011, and now here we are on 2012 on the doorstep of actually getting it passed.”

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Eminent Domain Constitutional Amendment

Ever since the Kelo v. City of New London case in 2005, legislators have been paying particularly close attention to their state’s eminent domain and property rights laws.  The Virginia General Assembly has analyzed the Code of Virginia in search of methods to protect Virginians and private property rights, and is considering a Constitutional Amendment to provide permanent protection.  Delegate Rob Bell is carrying HJ 3 in the House of Delegates in an attempt to provide that protection.

“This was an effort to address the abusive use of eminent domain by localities and other government agencies,” explains Delegate Bell.  “The goal would be to put property rights protection into the Virginia Constitution.  We passed a law in 2007.  I was the House patron and the then Senator Ken Cuccinelli was the Senate patron.  We passed laws to create protections for property owners, but it’s a law which it means that it is subject to change.  The goal that year, and ever since, has been to put protections into the Virginia Constitution where they can’t be changed by a subsequent legislature.  The amendment itself, which passed last year, will go before the public on the ballot in November if it passes this Session.  It does several things.  The first thing it says is that you can only take private property for public use.  You can’t take it and give it to somebody else, as happened in the Kelo case, which naturally prompted a great deal of this attention.  The second thing is that it says that you can’t acquire more property than you need.  That was out of a specific case in Hampton roads. They took the property. They took more than they needed and then instead of giving it back, they leased it out for a shopping center.  Then, the third thing it does is define what the actual compensation will be.  So, if someone has their property taken for public use they should be compensated.  It will help make sure that they get the full compensation for their property.  There is a Senate version and a House version.  We are optimistic that it will come up before the Privileges and Elections Committee on Friday.  We are hopeful that it will be reported out, and if so, that it will be heard on the floor next week.

The Constitutional Amendment is as controversial as the statute has been. Those who are condemners are very concerned about any restrictions on their ability to condemn.  As a result, the local governments have been ferociously opposed to this amendment. They have hired lobbyists to fight against it and have been working against the amendment.  When that was not possible, they have worked against the other legislation that we have introduced that go along with the amendment to help define the various terms and what not.  That is why the amendment didn’t pass in 2007.  It didn’t pass in 2009. We brought it in 2010, and we finally got it out in 2011, and now here we are on 2012 on the doorstep of actually getting it passed.”

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Eminent Domain Constitutional Amendment